To Upgrade (or not?)

We see all these attractive things in life. we want this, we want that, do we really need? we don’t ask that question. That is the ONE question and the OTHER question is what would it be if we don’t get that? The answers to these two questions pretty much sums up your next course of action.

However, often times it is not as simple as that. If you have a 10 year old Toyota Camry and you want a Mercedes 300, it’s one thing but what if you have a Windows XP PC (yeah!, you read it right) and it works just fine @ work or @ home and you need to upgrade to Windows 7 or 10 (Please don’t think of 8).  If it is @ home, at least you are the only one that is exposed but if it is your work, your exposure is whole lot and not just financially but also the number of people it will impact.  I’m going to focus on running unsupported software here.

I come across this scenario a lot and especially recently. The world has come across the fact that the 800 pound gorilla that has woken up (yes, I’m talking about Microsoft). They have started churning up software that is inline with current global market and to address the current global risks. In thinking through the process, there is no golden rule or a magic wand to figure out, is it time to bite the bullet and upgrade. However, we can come up some guiding principles or set of questions to help us in the decision making process. Based on the experience, interactions with our clients, feedback, industry pundits, I came up with a set of guiding principles. (Again this is just a sample.)

  • Are you in a regulated industry? Is your systems conforms to the govt. regulations
  • Do you have a corporate governance committee? Is your systems conforms to the governance rules laid out?
  • Is there and industry standards body that you are part of? Is your systems conform that (basically you are not just preaching but walking the talk)
  • When did you last perform an upgrade? How many versions are you behind?
  • Any (how many) of your systems use software that are not supported by respective vendors?
  • Are all customer facing systems are running supported software?
  • What is the cost of not performing an upgrade? What is your plan when Sh*** hits the fan or things stop working?

If you are in a regulated industry, you don’t have an wiggle room, you need to follow the govt. regulations. You need to be honest with yourself, thus you should be conforming to your own standards. These are rules that you laid for yourself that you should follow (remember those new year resolutions of going to the gym? – well this doesn’t belong in that category). You are part of a world / industry standards body and you need to stick up. if you are not then who will? Then comes when did you last perform an upgrade. I get it is a chore and too much impact etc. But if your answer is half a decade or more, you have reached a point where the cost of inaction is more than your action. If or how many are using unsupported – if the answer is more than ZERO and they are being used in a customer facing environment, you probably don’t have “a plan” for the last question. If it is the internal systems, you will be able to setup more security rules, un-maintained servers a.k.a – you got a parachute. However the last question is the most critical of the lot for your business. When you do this, you are not just jumping of the plane, but you are jumping off the plane with no parachutes (for anyone in your organization). Depending on how critical, you can make the jobs obsolete, in turn the employees and in result you own organization. Remember we read about stuff on the newspaper and other media about such incidents? Do you want to be one such example?

IMHO, the ideal upgrade is Three years and not more than FIVE. Beyond which, you will get into the problems of unsupported software, security, obsolete technology, rusted workforce and more.

What are your guiding principles? Drop me a line.

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